0 comments on “How to Use a Check Register to Take Control of Your Money”

How to Use a Check Register to Take Control of Your Money

I may be dating myself by discussing check registers. In this age of ubiquitous electronic payments, few use checks anymore. Today payments are posted to your account nearly immediately, so what you see online in your account really is what you have.

But it still may not be what you can spend. If you haven’t accounted for future expenses, it is easy to overspend, and that can result in an increasing credit card balance. With a simple check register you can create a plan for your money and avoid overspending.

Before electronic payments became so prevalent, it used to be you paid all your bills with a check, and it could take days, if not weeks, for the money to be withdrawn from your account. To avoid over drafting your account, you had to keep track of the checks you had already written but which hadn’t yet cleared. You did this in a check register.

Now days, I see people running into a different problem with their bank accounts. Because they aren’t keeping track, it’s easy to overspend. While you don’t have to worry that your account balance shows more money than you really have due to outstanding, un-cashed checks, you still can’t just go out and spend the money that’s there.

I recently helped a young woman, Kara, take control of her money by using a check register. Rather than using it to record money she had already spent, I encouraged her to use it to record money she expected to spend.

With each paycheck, Kara listed the deposit and then what would happen with every dollar of the money. She listed each bill she had to pay with the check. She also listed what she expected to spend on groceries, hair cuts, gas for the car, and other unavoidable expenses. Before she spent a dime, she knew exactly what it would be spent on.

In addition to the expenses that came up every month, she also allocated money for expenses that would come up in the future. Each paycheck, she set aside money for future car repairs and a trip she wanted to take. This way she knew how much money she really had to spend on non-essentials.

Back in the day, at the end of each month, good money management practice was to reconcile your bank balance with your check register. In this exercise, you accounted for all outstanding checks and made sure you corrected any errors. Similarly, Kara needed to reconcile the way she actually spent her money with how she had planned to spend it.

In addition to recording the deposit of her paycheck, Kara verified that the balance she predicted she would have was the balance she did have. In between paychecks,  if she had unavoidable unplanned expenses, she recorded those and adjusted her spending plans accordingly.

Sometimes things come up that you don’t foresee. You forget your lunch, so you have to buy it. You’re running late, so you have to drive, and pay for parking, rather than take the bus. Your electric bill is unusually high. By recording these kinds of unplanned expenses in her check register, Kara could see what needed to change before she spent more than she wanted.

It didn’t take long for Kara to get out of debt and begin to save money. She no longer needed to bridge the gap between her bills and her money with a credit card. She did it with a very old fashioned tool, the check register.

What she had actually done was create a budget. There are all kinds of high-tech tools for creating a budget. But when you boil it down, you still have to do the work of figuring out where your money is going to go. Sometimes it’s easier to see how things will play out if you build your plan by hand.

While you may no longer need to write checks, you do still need to keep track of where your money is going. A simple no-cost tool for doing that is a check register. It’s value today isn’t in recording the money that you’ve already spent. Instead, use it to record the money you plan to spend, and you will avoid spending more than you can afford.

2 comments on “Is Your Money Leaking Away?”

Is Your Money Leaking Away?

The other day, I was putting the cushions for our patio furniture away when I realized we have had them for at least ten years. They’re nothing special. I bought them at Home Depot for less than $20 each. They’re definitely not something you’d expect to last so long. So what is the secret?

The secret to their longevity is in what I was doing when I had my revelation; putting them away. We put the cushions in a container when we’re not sitting on them. They don’t get left out in the sun or the rain. They stay nice and dry and ready for use every time we want them.

They’re still in perfect condition. If I had to replace them today, it would cost me around $140 for the four of them. There you go. $140 saved. If you assume I would have replaced them at least a couple of times in the last ten years, had they not been so well protected, that’s a few hundred dollars saved.

I’ve written before about the value of maintaining the big things, like your car and your home systems and appliances. But there are lot’s of little places where your money can leak away.

It turns out your Mom and Dad were right.

“Put the tools away!”

“Don’t leave the windows open while the heat is on!”

“Don’t stand with the refrigerator door open!”

The reason they said those things, wasn’t to annoy you. It was to save them money.

If you put the tools away instead of leaving them out in the elements they last longer. Leaving even one window open with the heat or AC on needlessly increases your utility bill, as does leaving the refrigerator door open any longer than necessary.

Now, admittedly, you’re not going to retire on the money you save by putting your patio furniture cushions away, or making sure all your windows are closed if the heat is on. But money is a precious resource representing your time and hard work. Letting it slip away needlessly means you simply have less for other things that are actually important to you.

Maybe you would find a bit of extra money to take your partner out for a nice dinner. Or maybe you’re able to save up for that weekend get away sooner than you thought. Or you might just be able to increase the contributions to your retirement account.

Everyone has little ways that money quietly leaks away from them. Simply being cognizant of the possibility will help you find yours. If you can plug as many of those leaks as possible, you may be surprised by how much extra money you have to do the things that are truly important to you.

0 comments on “Five Rules to Get Your Spending Under Control”

Five Rules to Get Your Spending Under Control

Does your money simply disappear without you fully knowing what happened to it? It can be really frustrating, when you’re trying to save money, if you never seem to have anything left over at the end of the month.

When you don’t have a recollection of how you spent your money, you are spending it mindlessly. Essentially you have a habit, and when you have a habit you can do something without thinking about it.

It’s like when you drive home from work, but you can’t recall any of the details of your trip. You make all the right turns, avoid obstacles and securely arrive in your driveway without having to engage the decision making part of your brain.

Mindless spending can be a big road block to saving money. It can keep you living paycheck to paycheck even if you have a decent income. You pay your bills, go about your life and at the end of the month there isn’t anything left. You don’t really have anything to show for it. You just don’t have any money.

If this sounds like your life, you can change your spending habits by imposing a few rules on yourself. Rules are low barriers to spending, but they can be very effective. After following your rules consistently, you can change your spending habits.

Only you can decide what rules will work for you. But here are five that have worked well for others.

  1. Set your savings aside first. Put your savings goal in savings before you pay any bills, buy any groceries, go out to eat or do anything else. Use automatic deposits to savings to take the decision making off your plate.
  2. Give yourself an allowance. Aside from the bills you must pay, in other words, those you’ve agreed to pay by contract, allow yourself a specific amount of money to pay for everything else. Your groceries, gas, entertainment, essentially everything else must be paid from the allowance. The amount you choose should leave room in your monthly income to meet your savings goals.
  3. Only carry cash. Studies have shown that you are more conscious of your spending when you physically experience the cash leaving your hand than when you swipe a card to pay for your purchases. If any cash you carry disappears, carry only enough for purchases you plan ahead of time. If you don’t plan to buy something on a given day, don’t carry any cash or your cards. If you need to put gas in your car, only carry enough cash to fill the tank.
  4. Only go out if it’s an event. Skip the $10 sandwiches scarfed at your desk. Not only will you not remember you spent your money on them, you won’t remember eating them. Save your restaurant trips for experiences you’ll remember, like a date night, a celebration or catching up with a friend.
  5. Give yourself a cooling off period. If you are tempted to buy something that wasn’t in your plan, give yourself 24 hours to think it over. Chances are it won’t be quite as appealing once you’ve turned your back on it. If the day goes by, and you really think the object of your desire is your priority, you’ll have had time to figure out how to rearrange your spending plan.

Find something that works for you. If you are ready to prioritize saving over spending, giving yourself some rules can help you change your spending patterns. Once you get the hang of it, you won’t be able to stop being conscientious with your money. You will know too much.

 

 

0 comments on “Don’t Gloss Over the Cost of College”

Don’t Gloss Over the Cost of College

If you have a high school junior at home, you may have spent the week of spring break touring a few college campuses. It’s the perfect time to kick off the college selection process with your prospective college student.

You want the world to be your child’s oyster, and no one wants to talk about expenses when dreaming about the future. However, as you reflect upon the tours, it is a good time to bring a dose of reality into the equation.

College is expensive no matter where your child chooses to go, but some choices will set you back farther than others. The following chart shows the average cost of college for the 2017-2018 school year from the College Board.

Average Cost of College

While most parents want to send there children to college, only about 57 percent of them save for it. The average household savings for college was only $16,380, according to Sallie Mae. That means the money must come from somewhere else. The following chart shows how America pays for college, also from Sallie Mae.

How America Pays for College

A full 28 percent of the cost of college will be paid for with loans. The average student loan debt per borrower from the class of 2016 was $27,975. At the current Federal Direct student loan interest rate of 4.45% for undergraduates, over the standard 10 year repayment period, payments on loans of that amount will be about $289 per month.

That can be a significant piece of a new graduate’s entry level job income. It’s no wonder that 30 percent of college graduates with student debt move back in with their parents. With money like this on the line, it is important to sit down with your future college student and cover the facts.

Here are five things to discuss with your child before she chooses a school.

  • Tell your student how much you will be able to pay. This includes what you have saved and what you are willing to commit to out of your income. The converse of this is how much should she expect to pay. Only 70 percent of parents of teenagers have discussed their expectations with their child.
  • Outline options for raising the extra money. In addition to student loans and scholarships, your student may be able to raise some money through part-time or full-time work. Taking a gap year to work and save up for school is a reasonable approach.
  • Help your student understand the implications of their choices. Student loans may be hard to avoid, but they can certainly be minimized if you understand your trade-offs. You can calculate the monthly payments given different loan amounts on the Federal Student Aid web site.
  • Provide context for the information. Estimate the kind of monthly salary your student might earn given her career interests. Payscale’s College Salary Report is a good place to start. It wouldn’t hurt to also talk about average living expenses. Career Trends has a cost of living calculator. Don’t forget to show the impact of taxes. How much of her take home pay will be left after student loan payments?
  • Consider starting school at a community college. The average cost per year at public two year colleges is only $3,570 assuming your student can stay at home while she attends.

If you don’t have enough saved to pay for college, think carefully about the impact of paying for school out of your current income. If you are behind in saving for your own retirement, paying for college should not be your top priority. Your child has time to recover from the expenses of school. You do not.

A college education can substantially improve your child’s ability to earn a living. But taking on a lot of debt to pay for it can weaken her financial stability. Help her understand that her choices have implications for her lifestyle after school. Before she makes her final decision, she should know what she’s in for.

 

0 comments on “New vs Used: A Different Angle on Car Buying Advice”

New vs Used: A Different Angle on Car Buying Advice

In the market for a car? There isn’t much debate when it comes to the question of whether you should buy a new or used one. Most advice you can find says go used. But that is too broad. There is little reference to the cost of the remaining life of the car when discussing the merits of used cars over new ones. This can be a critical miss.

New cars depreciate the moment they are driven off the lot. In the first year the value of the car drops by nearly 30 percent, according to Edmunds. By the time the car is five years old it will have lost half its value. But does that necessarily make buying a car after it has depreciated a better deal?

Even with the depreciated value, used cars valued on a price per remaining mile may not compare well. In a very unscientific survey of local used cars, most actually did not.

The following chart shows 4 cylinder Honda Accords, model years 2014 to 2017, available in the Portland Metro area and listed on UsedCars.com.  These are compared to a brand new 4 cylinder Honda Accord based on an on-line quote from a local dealer.

used cars 200000

Of the used cars currently on the market 70 percent were priced at a higher per remaining mile level than the new car. If you want to own your car for fewer miles, the comparison is even worse. The following chart shows the price per mile if you assume you only want to drive the car until it hits 100,000 miles. Only one of the used cars was a better deal than the new car on this basis.

used cars 100000

Cars have become very reliable. Most can be expected to last for 200,000 miles or more with recommended maintenance. The average driver could easily own a car for 15 years. Whether you plan to own your car until it dies, or you tend to sell your cars when they hit a mileage milestone, what you are paying for the remaining life is an important consideration.

The conventional wisdom to buy a used car instead of a new one may not always be good advice. While you will pay less in absolute dollars, you may not get a better value. Comparing the value given the miles you will be able to drive the car may very well lead you to buy new instead.

Image courtesy of Gualberto107 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

2 comments on “The 12 Days of Financial Security for Christmas”

The 12 Days of Financial Security for Christmas

 

Forget the birds and performing artists. These are the 12 gifts of financial security!

On the first day of Christmas my true love gave to me a fund for emergencies

On the second day of Christmas my true love gave to me a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies

On the third day of Christmas my true love gave to me a maxed out retirement, a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies

On the fourth day of Christmas my true love gave to me a pay-down on my visa, a maxed out retirement, a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies

On the fifth day of Christmas my true love gave to me a Roth IRA, a pay-down on my visa, a maxed out retirement, a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies

On the sixth day of Christmas my true love gave to me full estate planning, a Roth IRA, a pay-down on my visa, a maxed out retirement, a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies

On the seventh day of Christmas my true love gave to me insurance for disabilities, full estate planning, a Roth IRA, a pay-down on my visa, a maxed out retirement, a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies

On the eighth day of Christmas my true love gave to me a 529 for my kids, insurance for disabilities, full estate planning, a Roth IRA, a pay-down on my visa, a maxed out retirement, a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies

On the ninth day of Christmas my true love gave to me a pay-down on my student loans, a 529 for my kids, insurance for disabilities, full estate planning, a Roth IRA, a pay-down on my visa, a maxed out retirement, a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies

On the tenth day of Christmas my true love gave to me a sound investment strategy, a pay-down on my student loans, a 529 for my kids, insurance for disabilities, full estate planning, a Roth IRA, a pay-down on my visa, a maxed out retirement, a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies.

On the eleventh day of Christmas my true love gave to me a long-term care policy, a sound investment strategy, a pay-down on my student loans, a 529 for my kids, insurance for disabilities, full estate planning, a Roth IRA, a pay-down on my visa, a maxed out retirement, a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies.

On the twelfth day of Christmas my true love gave to me, a pledge to be mortgage free, a long-term care policy, a sound investment strategy, a pay-down on my student loans, a 529 for my kids, insurance for disabilities, full estate planning, a Roth IRA, a pay-down on my visa, a maxed out retirement, a budget for expenses and a fund for emergencies.

Merry Christmas everyone!

0 comments on “Tips for Dealing With the High Cost of Healthcare”

Tips for Dealing With the High Cost of Healthcare

Healthcare plans are changing. As insurers seek to limit the increases in their premiums and employers seek to lower their costs for providing this important benefit, those who need healthcare are left holding more of the bag. There are a few things you can do to prepare and limit your costs.

Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, many typical medical expenses are required to be covered by both individual and group healthcare plans. And the summary of benefits has been standardized so you can more easily understand your coverage, copayments, deductibles and out-of-pocket maximum costs.

Unfortunately these seem to be on an unending march upward. Regardless of the plan, your share of the cost of healthcare, on top of your premiums, is growing. The increasing use of Consumer Driven Healthcare Plans (CDHPs), also known as high deductible plans, and the elimination of out-of-network coverage in many cases are two developments that can lower your premium but still drive up what you pay for healthcare.

CDHPs

The number of companies offering CDHPs, or high deductible plans, has grown sharply in the last ten years. An annual survey by the National Business Group on Health found that 90 percent of large employers are offering at least one CDHP, and 40 percent will offer only a CDHP in 2018. Almost one third of all covered employees are now enrolled in a CDHP according to a Mercer study.

While wellness exams are fully covered under all healthcare plans now, in CDHPs you must pay for services beyond wellness exams out of your pocket until the high deductible is met. Often the savings on the premium can at least partially offset the expenses, making the lower coverage worthwhile. But there are a couple of things you can do to further limit your costs.

Take advantage of the Health Savings Account (HSA). The HSA is a tax advantaged way to save for your out-of-pocket medical expenses. Your contributions to the HSA are pre-tax, saving you the equivalent of your tax rate on medical expenses paid out of the account. Your contributions to your HSA are yours to keep, with no requirement to spend them by the end of the year. Your goal should be to accumulate at least enough to cover your deductible in the HSA.

Shop around for your prescription medications. Before you spend your deductible you will pay the cash price for your medications. There can be a shocking difference among the cash prices charged by different pharmacies. So it pays to shop around.

Try goodrx.com to see where your prescriptions are cheapest. One prescription I checked ranged in price from $38 at Costco to $341 at Rite Aid.

There can be substantial savings for name brand, non-narcotic drugs purchased through Canadian pharmacies. One name brand prescription can be bought for $78 for a three months supply vs $497 at the lowest cost U.S. pharmacy.  Check out eDrugSearch.com to find the lowest prices for your medications. If the pharmacy is certified, you can be assured they get the medications from the same manufacturers as U.S. pharmacies.

These pharmacies will be out-of-network, so the cost of your medication may not apply to your deductible or out of pocket maximum, but the savings can make that sacrifice well worth while.

Finally, many pharmaceutical companies offer coupons on your name brand medications to make them more affordable. Check your medication’s manufacturer’s web site for offers.

Loss of Out-of-Network Coverage

Whether your plan is a CDHP or not, increasingly, health insurers are cutting out-of-network coverage. Out-of-network coverage pays providers even if they haven’t negotiated pricing with the insurer. Your share of the cost is higher, but your out-of-pocket costs are still limited by the plan maximums. If there is no out-of-network coverage, you will fully pay for services, and the expenses will not go toward your annual maximum out-of-pocket expenses.

This is a big issue with emergency room services. The ACA requires insurers to cover “reasonable” expenses for emergency care regardless of the hospital you use. However the hospital and the service providers working there, are free to bill you for their fees above what the insurer pays them if they are out-of-network.

Even if you seek care at an in-network hospital, the doctor who attends you may not be an in-network doctor. Hospitals often contract their emergency room physicians from outside doctor groups. If you are attended by an out-of-network doctor in the ER, you could be billed for their service separately, and your insurance would not cover the cost. The practice is called balance billing.

The Commonwealth Fund, a private foundation funding healthcare research, reported that 14 percent of those who had visited the ER received an unexpected bill from an out-of-network doctor. Of those who were subsequently admitted to the hospital, 20 percent received an unexpected balance bill. Seven in ten who had unaffordable healthcare bills did not know their provider was out-of-network, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Consumer Reports offers some advice to help you protect yourself. If a family member or friend accompanies you to the hospital, during registration, they should request you be treated only by an in-network doctor if you arrive at an in-network hospital. At discharge, your companion should request a print-out of all charges in case you must fight the bill later.

Carefully validate your bills against the list of charges. If you receive an out-of-network balance bill, check with your insurer to see if you can get them to pay it as part of the emergency coverage. If not, negotiate with the doctor. If that doesn’t get your bill within reach, file an appeal with your insurer. The Patient Advocate Foundation can provide advice on filing an appeal for free. If all else fails, file an appeal with your state insurance commissioner.

Healthcare has become a consumer nightmare. To avoid bills beyond what you can afford make sure you have savings to cover your share of the costs. Take charge of your medical bills by shopping around for the best prices on medications, and be willing to go to bat for yourself if necessary.

Image courtesy of Serge Bertasius Photography at FreeDigitalPhotos.net